This statement clarifies the ethical behaviour of all parties involved in the act of publishing an article in Journal of Holistic Nursing Science (JHNS). Please read COPE’s Best Practice Guidelines for Journal Editors for further information.


Ethics and Malpractice Statement
Journal of Holistic Nursing Science (JHNS) is committed to ensuring the highest standards of publication ethics whereas the publication malpractice is strictly prohibited by all possible measure. Our responsibility is to publish original work of value to the intellectual community in the best possible form and to the highest possible standards. We expect similar standards from our reviewers and authors. Honesty, originality, and fair dealing on the part of authors, and fairness, objectivity, and confidentiality on the part of editors and reviewers are among the critical values that enable us to achieve our goal. Journal of Holistic Nursing Science (JHNS) endorses and behaves in accordance with the codes of conduct and international standards established by the Committee on Publication Ethics. Journal of Holistic Nursing Science (JHNS) is committed to following best practices on ethical matters, errors, and retractions, and to provide a legal review if necessary. ‘Salami’ publication also strictly prohibited in Journal of Holistic Nursing Science (JHNS).
In the case of experimenting on human, the authors have certified that the process of the research is in accordance with ethical standards of Helsinki declaration, domestic and foreign committees that preside over human experi­ment. If any doubts are raised whether the research has proceeded in accordance with the declaration, the authors should explain it. In the case of experimenting on animals, the authors have certified that the authors had followed the domestic and foreign guideline related to the experiment of animals in a laboratory.

Reporting Standards
Authors’ reports of original research should present an accurate account of the work performed as well as an objective discussion of its significance. Underlying data should be represented accurately in the paper. A paper should contain sufficient detail and references to permit others to replicate the work. Fraudulent or knowingly inaccurate statements constitute unethical behavior and are unacceptable. Review and professional publication articles should also be accurate and objective, and editorial 'opinion' works should be clearly identified as such.

Data access and retention
Authors may be asked to provide the raw data in connection with a paper for editorial review, and should, in any event, be prepared to retain such data for a reasonable time after publication.

Originality and plagiarism
The authors should ensure that they have written entirely original works, and if the authors have used the work and/or words of others, that this has been appropriately cited or quoted. Plagiarism takes many forms, from 'passing off' another's paper as the author's own paper, to copying or paraphrasing substantial parts of another's paper (without attribution), to claiming results from research conducted by others. Plagiarism in all its forms constitutes unethical publishing behavior and is unacceptable. We will check each manuscript using plagiarism checker to ensure the originality of the article. Furthermore, each submitted article should be accompanied by a letter of statement from the author(s) stating that the article is free from plagiarism.

Multiple, redundant or concurrent publication
An author should not, in general, publish manuscripts describing essentially the same research in more than one journal or primary publication. Submitting the same manuscript to more than one journal concurrently constitutes unethical publishing behavior and is unacceptable. In general, an author should not submit for consideration in another journal a previously published paper.

Acknowledgment of sources
Proper acknowledgment of the work of others must always be given. Authors should cite publications that have been influential in determining the nature of the reported work. Information obtained privately, as in conversation, correspondence, or discussion with third parties, must not be used or reported without explicit, written permission from the source. Information obtained in the course of confidential services, such as referring manuscripts or grant applications, must not be used without the explicit written permission of the author of the work involved in these services. Author(s) should also give the editor the data and details of the work if there are suspicions of data falsification or fabrication.

Authorship of the paper
Authorship should be limited to those who have made a significant contribution to the conception, design, execution, or interpretation of the reported study. All those who have made significant contributions should be listed as co-authors. Where there are others who have participated in certain substantive aspects of the research project, they should be acknowledged or listed as contributors. The corresponding author should ensure that all co-authors have seen and approved the final version of the paper and have agreed to its submission for publication.

Disclosure and conflicts of interest
All authors should disclose in their manuscript any financial or other substantive conflicts of interest that might be constructed to influence the results or interpretation of their manuscript. All sources of financial support for the project should be disclosed. Examples of potential conflicts of interest which should be disclosed include employment, consultancies, stock ownership, honoraria, paid expert testimony, patent applications/ registrations, and grants or other funding. Potential conflicts of interest should be disclosed at the earliest stage possible.

Fundamental errors in published works
When an author discovers a significant error or inaccuracy in his/her own published work, it is the author's obligation to promptly notify the journal editor or publisher and cooperate with the editor to retract or correct the paper. If the editor or the publisher learns from a third party that a published work contains a significant error, it is the obligation of the author to promptly retract or correct the paper or provide evidence to the editor of the correctness of the original paper.